Signal Synchronization New

Skip navigation Reduce Motion High Contrast Careers Contact Us
Skip to main content
  • Signal Synchronization

    Traffic light synchronization relieves congestion

    Driving through multiple cities without stopping at red lights can be difficult and time consuming, in part because each city controls its own traffic signals. OCTA is helping to synchronize traffic lights across the county to improve the quality of your drive.

    More green lights

    Orange County's population is expected to increase 13 percent by 2035, and that means more drivers on our roadways. To ease growing traffic demands, OCTA, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), the County of Orange and all 34 cities are working together to coordinate traffic lights across the county.

    Traffic signal synchronization allows a series of lights to turn green in advance of arriving traffic based on synchronized timers set to current traffic conditions and congestion levels.

    OCTA improves traffic flow by coordinating traffic lights across city boundaries. Most signal timing projects result in a 5 to 15 percent improvement in travel time and speed, reducing travel times, stops and delays.

    Signal Sync 101 – let's get technical!

    OCTA typically funds signal coordination projects that use time-based synchronization. This technique maintains a long string of green lights across city boundaries using an accurate time reference to coordinate signals. Coordinated signals allow green lights to "cascade" in sequence so a group of vehicles can proceed through multiple green lights before stopping at a red light.

    Your Tax Dollars at Work

    Signal synchronization is a cost-effective way to minimize congestion by improving street and road capacity without costly and disruptive new construction. Projects throughout the county have been funded by a variety of local, state, and federal sources.

    Summary

    The Measure M2 Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program (RTSSP), also known as Project P, provides funding and assistance to implement multi-agency signal synchronization. The target of the program is to regularly coordinate 2,000 signals along 750 miles of roadway as the basis for synchronized operation across Orange County.

    To date, OCTA and local agencies have synchronized more than 2,000 intersections along more than 600 miles of streets (or 69 completed projects). The OCTA Board of Directors, through a competitive process, have approved eight rounds of M2 funding for Project P. On June 11, 2018, the Board awarded $8.9 million dollars to six projects as part of the 2018 Call for Projects Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program (RTSSP).  OCTA staff leveraged the M2 funding for $6.6 million from SB-1 to fully fund all Call 8 Project P applications. To date, this program has provided a total of 103 projects totaling more than $98 million, including $18 million in external funding.

    34 projects are planned or in progress through Project P. As of October 2018, the program has resulted in:

      • 69 completed signal synchronization projects
      • $98 million in funding awarded by the OCTA Board of Directors
      • Approximately $46 million in improvements along 613 miles and 2,367 signals
      • Travel time savings: 13%
      • Speed improvements: 15%
      • Stop reduction: 31%
      • $144.5 million estimated project life gas savings
      • 750 million pounds of Greenhouse Gas savings

    Signal Synchronization from 2007 to 2011

    After completing two signal synchronization demonstration projects on Euclid Street and Oso Parkway/Pacific Park Drive that comprised of 86 signals and 24 miles through eleven jurisdictions, OCTA advanced signal synchronization efforts along ten arterial corridors comprised of 585 signalized intersections on 158 miles of roadway. This $8 million effort was funded by Proposition 1B Grants and the Measure M1 Traffic Light Synchronization Program (TLSP). The ten projects helped eased drivers traveling throughout the county.

    In 2011, OCTA implemented signal synchronization along three more corridors (Harbor Boulevard, State College Boulevard-Bristol Street, and Westminster Avenue) as transportation control measures for the purpose of reducing emissions by reducing congestion conditions. The corridors included 252 signalized intersections and 46 miles of roadway through ten jurisdictions. The project budget was $1.8 million and was funded by federal transit and air quality revenues. OCTA also funded an additional corridor with M1 funds totaling $520,000. The Magnolia Street corridor synchronized 53 signals along 16 miles of roadway through seven jurisdictions.

    Traffic Synchronization Program Projects

    Overview

    Traffic light synchronization relieves congestion

    Driving through multiple cities without stopping at red lights can be difficult and time consuming, in part because each city controls its own traffic signals. OCTA is helping to synchronize traffic lights across the county to improve the quality of your drive.

    More green lights

    Orange County's population is expected to increase 13 percent by 2035, and that means more drivers on our roadways. To ease growing traffic demands, OCTA, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), the County of Orange and all 34 cities are working together to coordinate traffic lights across the county.

    Traffic signal synchronization allows a series of lights to turn green in advance of arriving traffic based on synchronized timers set to current traffic conditions and congestion levels.

    OCTA improves traffic flow by coordinating traffic lights across city boundaries. Most signal timing projects result in a 5 to 15 percent improvement in travel time and speed, reducing travel times, stops and delays.

    Signal Sync 101 – let's get technical!

    OCTA typically funds signal coordination projects that use time-based synchronization. This technique maintains a long string of green lights across city boundaries using an accurate time reference to coordinate signals. Coordinated signals allow green lights to "cascade" in sequence so a group of vehicles can proceed through multiple green lights before stopping at a red light.

    Details

    Your Tax Dollars at Work

    Signal synchronization is a cost-effective way to minimize congestion by improving street and road capacity without costly and disruptive new construction. Projects throughout the county have been funded by a variety of local, state, and federal sources.

    Summary

    The Measure M2 Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program (RTSSP), also known as Project P, provides funding and assistance to implement multi-agency signal synchronization. The target of the program is to regularly coordinate 2,000 signals along 750 miles of roadway as the basis for synchronized operation across Orange County.

    To date, OCTA and local agencies have synchronized more than 2,000 intersections along more than 600 miles of streets (or 69 completed projects). The OCTA Board of Directors, through a competitive process, have approved eight rounds of M2 funding for Project P. On June 11, 2018, the Board awarded $8.9 million dollars to six projects as part of the 2018 Call for Projects Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program (RTSSP).  OCTA staff leveraged the M2 funding for $6.6 million from SB-1 to fully fund all Call 8 Project P applications. To date, this program has provided a total of 103 projects totaling more than $98 million, including $18 million in external funding.

    34 projects are planned or in progress through Project P. As of October 2018, the program has resulted in:

      • 69 completed signal synchronization projects
      • $98 million in funding awarded by the OCTA Board of Directors
      • Approximately $46 million in improvements along 613 miles and 2,367 signals
      • Travel time savings: 13%
      • Speed improvements: 15%
      • Stop reduction: 31%
      • $144.5 million estimated project life gas savings
      • 750 million pounds of Greenhouse Gas savings

    Signal Synchronization from 2007 to 2011

    After completing two signal synchronization demonstration projects on Euclid Street and Oso Parkway/Pacific Park Drive that comprised of 86 signals and 24 miles through eleven jurisdictions, OCTA advanced signal synchronization efforts along ten arterial corridors comprised of 585 signalized intersections on 158 miles of roadway. This $8 million effort was funded by Proposition 1B Grants and the Measure M1 Traffic Light Synchronization Program (TLSP). The ten projects helped eased drivers traveling throughout the county.

    In 2011, OCTA implemented signal synchronization along three more corridors (Harbor Boulevard, State College Boulevard-Bristol Street, and Westminster Avenue) as transportation control measures for the purpose of reducing emissions by reducing congestion conditions. The corridors included 252 signalized intersections and 46 miles of roadway through ten jurisdictions. The project budget was $1.8 million and was funded by federal transit and air quality revenues. OCTA also funded an additional corridor with M1 funds totaling $520,000. The Magnolia Street corridor synchronized 53 signals along 16 miles of roadway through seven jurisdictions.

    Traffic Synchronization Program Projects

    Videos
    Gallery
    Stay Informed

Overview Tab Content:

Details Tab Content:

    • The Measure M2 Project P 2018 Call for Projects awarded nearly $8.9 million for 6 projects that includes 22 jurisdictions and will synchronize 310 signals along 78 miles of Orange County streets and roads. In addition, OCTA was awarded a nearly $6.6 million SB-1 Grant in matching funds for four of the awarded projects. These matching funds build on the Measure M2 investment and allow OCTA to deploy additional resources to signal synchronization through future Calls for Projects.

      2018 M2 Project P Projects: Orangethorpe Avenue, Katella Avenue*, Main Street*, Los Alisos Boulevard Route*, Culver Drive/Bonita Canyon/Ford, and Garden Grove Boulevard*.

      *Partially funded by SB-1 Grant

    • The Measure M2 Project P 2017 Call for Projects awarded nearly $2.5 million for 5 projects that included 7 jurisdictions to synchronize 87 signals along 22 miles of Orange County streets and roads.

      2017 M2 Project P Projects: Irvine Boulevard, Gilbert Street/Idaho Street, Camino Vera Cruz, Bear Street, and Olympiad Road-Felipe Road.
    • The Measure M2 Project P 2016 Call for Projects awarded nearly $12.5 million for 7 projects that included 14 jurisdictions to synchronize 259 signals along 75 miles of Orange County streets and roads.

      2016 M2 Project P Projects: Brookhurst Street, El Toro Road, Fairview Road, Irvine Center Drive/Edinger Avenue, Magnolia Street, Marguerite Parkway, and Von Karman/Tustin Ranch Road

    • The Measure M2 Project P 2015 Call for Projects awarded nearly $16 million for 7 projects that included 20 jurisdictions to synchronize 310 signals along 81 miles of Orange County streets and roads.

      2015 M2 Project P Projects:Chapman Avenue, Westminster Avenue/17th Street, Alicia Parkway, Imperial Highway/SR-90, Malvern Avenue/Chapman Avenue (North), Coast Highway, and La Palma Avenue

    • The Measure M2 Project P 2014 Call for Projects awarded approximately $8 million for 10 projects that included 16 jurisdictions to synchronize 238 signals along 59 miles of Orange County streets and roads.

      2014 M2 Project P Projects:Anaheim Boulevard, Orangewood Avenue, Birch Street/Rose Drive, Artesia Boulevard, Bristol Street, Sunflower Avenue, El Toro Road, Moulton Parkway, La Paz Road, and Harbor Boulevard

    • The Measure M2 Project P 2013 Call for Projects awarded nearly $15 million for 13 projects that included 16 jurisdictions to synchronize 366 signals along 100 miles of Orange County streets and roads.

      OCTA was awarded a $1.25 million Mobile Source Air Pollution Review Committee (MSRC) Grant in matching funds for six projects awarded as part of the 2013 Call, including 131 signals along 38 miles of Orange County streets and roads through nine jurisdictions. These matching funds build on the Measure M2 investment and allow OCTA to deploy additional resources to signal synchronization through future Calls for Projects.

      2013 M2 Projects: Antonio Parkway*, Newport Boulevard (South), Bake Parkway, Kraemer Boulevard/Glassell Street/Grand Avenue, Adams Avenue*, Seal Beach/Los Alamitos Boulevard, Barranca Parkway, State College Boulevard*, Alton Parkway, Newport Avenue/Boulevard*, Harbor Boulevard, Trabuco Road*, and Jeronimo Road*
      *Partially funded by the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC)

    • The Measure M2 Project P 2012 Call for Projects awarded nearly $10 million for 23 projects that included 24 jurisdictions to synchronize 517 signals along 137 miles of Orange County streets and roads.

      2012 M2 Project P Projects:Ball Road, Knott Avenue, 17th Street, Baker Street/Placentia Avenue, Victoria Street, Brea Boulevard, Commonwealth Avenue, Lemon Street/Anaheim Boulevard, Placentia Avenue (Fullerton), Culver Drive, Jeffrey Road, La Habra Boulevard/Central Avenue/State College Boulevard, Lake Forest Drive, Pacific Park/Oso Parkway, Paseo de Valencia, Los Alisos Boulevard, Newport Coast Drive, San Joaquin Hills Road, Santa Margarita Parkway, Avenida Vista Hermosa, Camino de Los Mares, Edinger Avenue, and First Street/Bolsa Avenue
    • The Measure M2 2011 Call for Projects awarded nearly $8 million for 16 projects that included 22 jurisdictions to synchronize 498 signals along 135 miles of Orange County streets and roads.

      2011 M2 Project P Projects:Lincoln Avenue, Valley View Street, Fairview Road, Warner Avenue, Bastanchury Road, Euclid Street, Goldenwest Street, Jamboree Road, Lambert Road, Crown Valley Parkway, Marguerite Parkway, Avenida Pico, El Camino Real, Del Obispo Street, MacArthur Boulevard/Talbert Avenue, and Tustin Avenue/Rose Drive

Detours Tab Content:

Stay Informed Form (defined by 'ekfrm' parameter in URL):

Get Connected